Category Archives: Entertainment

So I Asked Myself to be My Valentine…

So I asked myself to be my Valentine… and I said yes!! It was a wonderful day, I took myself out and got my nails and hair done, and then ended the day with a delicious seafood meal from Pappadeaux. It was a fabulous time, with beautiful weather, I really enjoyed my company. We’ll have to do this again.
#ValentinesDay #SelfCare #TheReturnOfJoy #GettingMyGrooveBack

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My girl Tanya Does Hair Mason has me #snatched. I appreciate her so much. A girl is getting her groove back around these parts. #Hair #RealHair #NaturalHair

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Jesse, You Aint Gotta Worry Boo!!

you aint gotta worry boo

I don’t have to tell you the story, that is unless you live under a really big rock, or were on Juno as it just reached Jupiter this weekend. Jesse Williams dropped the mic of all mics. He came and swooped up the souls of Black folks still ailing from countless slaughters on American streets. He deposited hope into our veins reminiscent only of the days of Bellafonte, King and X. Many, myself included, are now under this voice for the first time in our lives. Eloquent but with the delivery of a “we aint taking no more of your stuff” Black Panther-esque. His speech last week at the BET Awards was one of classic television. This call to action, the action to know your own worth. Speaking to the depths of heart and spirit. We applauded him.

Others didn’t. In these days when presidential candidates align themselves clearly with white supremacists theories, it is immoral to those of warped mindset to allow their views to be questioned. The daring of calling truth to the carpet is in their minds reason to call foul, so they packed their white privilege into deflective napsacks and called  Jesse a racist. I suppose I shouldn’t be surprised when I stare flagrant ignorance in the face, yet I find my chin needing to be pulled up from the dropped position as I remind myself that this is nothing new. When the Whistleblower calls out a racist system, that racist system looks for every opportunity to remove accountability from itself, and thus references the Whistleblower negligent in some way or fashion. This is as ludicrous as it would be to accuse the sexual assault victim of guilt because her skirt was too high. Oops, this happens in this society everyday. My bad.

So there was a petition on change.org circulating to get Jesse fired from Grey’s Anatomy because he was a so-called racist. Then there was a counter petition on the same site calling for empathy for his stand while requesting he be allowed to keep his position on the show. Okay so I suppose it’s easy to say these things after the fact, but I can honestly say I wasn’t worried.

Why There Was No Need To Worry

See if you were a real Jesse Williams fan before the BET awards, if you’ve been following his Tweets on matters of racial discrimination, police brutality and Black beauty and purpose, you’d know that his speech on BET was nothing more than an extension of the sentiments he shares regularly. Dude drops bows on em like regularly! You know how many cups of tea I’ve sipped as he’s offered gems dripped in jewels on the truths of our condition and what we need to do to overcome it. He got my attention after marching in the streets for Mike Brown in Ferguson when very very few celebrities, or clergy were willing to do much more than a nod in solidarity for heinous acts against humans in Black skin.

Annnnd if you were a real Shonda Rhimes fan and have been watching Grey’s Anatomy for a decade, and have taken any and all joyous rides in and throughout ShondaLand, then you’d know that she very likely shares Jesse’s views. I’m just saying. Jesse isn’t going anywhere. But I do find it all the more heart fluttering that she made this be known with her simple Tweet, “Um, people? Boo don’t need a petition.

So today I sit in the beautiful and warm afterglow of black conscious folk, who have not only power and pull in Hollywood, but care enough about Black folk to put that power and pull to work in a real way.

#DropsMicWhileSprinklingRealBlackFolkMagic #JesseWilliamsIsASuperhero

 

 

My Prince Story

prince1000I think it has just started to sink in that this is real. Prince died two days ago. To type those words is weird. I feel like I said a bad word or something. What I have been doing in his honor though is posting videos on Facebook of Prince’s live performances from the 70’s through last week. Watching him on stage reminded me of the once in a lifetime experience I had of seeing him live and in the flesh.

It was July of 1986 when the Parade/Under the Cherry Moon concert came to Denver, I was 12 years old. I begged my dad to take me to the concert. I had to see Prince or I would die, just like any other little girl who couldn’t go without something she treasured. My dad on the other hand was not thrilled, he had no interest in going at all, but after my ferocious pursuit for tickets and a chaperon, he gave in. During the entire drive to McNichols Arena my dad complained about not really wanting to go through with this, how he was really not all that much of Prince fan.  I remember debating him on how he should be one, (I guess I’ve been arguing points my whole life. lol), I stood on the fact that Prince was the greatest artist to live. I loved Michael too, but Prince to me was an act of being grown up. I was excited about this concert and I had reason to be.

Miracle #1. We sat in our seats for all of 2 minutes. We were up and out of them for the remainder of the two hours of the show, cheering, clapping, singing as if we were witnessing something genius, and we were. Prince Rogers Nelson got on that stage and performed at 10 from beginning to close. He danced and sung non-stop, actually I take that back, he stopped singing and dancing only long enough to play every instrument on the stage. The piano, the drums, the synthesizer, the bongos, and of course the guitar were all played with highest precision. From Pop, to R&B, to Rock, he performed every genre of music masterfully.  We were exhausted leaving the arena, on the other hand Prince seemed unphased by all he’d just put out.

Miracle number 2. That ride back home was a very different one than the ride to the concert.  My dad couldn’t stop talking about how bad Prince was.  He went on and on about how Prince had gone from one instrument to the next, how he didn’t realize how many hits Prince had, how Prince never stopped moving once he hit the stage, how this was the very best concert he’d seen in all his life. This being only my second concert I’d attended in my young life, one could say I didn’t have much to compare it to, but my father’s perspective was much greater than mine at that time. We both left there that day knowing we’d just experienced greatness, and we had. I had more reason to believe Prince was the greatest, my dad had new reason to be a lifelong fan.

So I guess that’s the mark that royalty leaves. You never forget when you’ve witnessed genius, you feel blessed to have been in it’s presence. Prince was an agglomerate of talent, he was a contortionist of art, he was an artist’s favorite artist.  To see him live was something that is beyond description. And it’s only now that I wish I’d encouraged more people to see him in person. He lived up to his name. There will never be another like him. Prince.