Category Archives: Injustice

Philando Castile, Close to Home

Philando

There are the times when police shootings of innocent men hit us harder than others. It’s all tragic, it’s all loss, but because we’re human sometimes we’re affected with one story more than another. We have to be because taking in too much tragedy is not good for the soul.

For me it was Sean Bell, Trayvon Martin, Eric Gardner, Sandra Bland, all for different reasons, these tragedies hit me in a deep and personal place.

Now Philando Castile affects me in that same place, with the legacy of all the others behind him.

Every person who knew him called him kind, sweet, generous. I have had to go to the Father so regularly in fighting the urge to fall into a low place over his senseless death. That tragedy can strike because of an assumed threat, based on the color of your skin, even though you are kind, generous, AND innocent, is an overwhelming notion.

The boy with the disability holding the sign in the picture, says more than what is written on his board. Losing someone special to him surely hits him harder than it would most. When someone is kind when you have a need that is outside the norm, you are dealing with an extremely dear person. #Tears

Praying for his family, his friends, for our nation, and for the hearts of many like me who have been hit hard by this loss. #LetTheKindAndGenerousKeepYourHeadUp #BlackLivesMatter

 

 

Autism in Black, and the Police

tifflivefeed.pngCheck out my live feed on Autism and Black and Brown boys. This subject hits home for me. Click here —> http://bit.ly/2nKhO5E

#WeAllWantOurChildrenSafe

Alton and Philando

I had a flashback. In my very conscious effort to diffuse all that’s going on right now from my spirit and mind, I am reminded that I actually have the option to diffuse. I along with anyone who takes their emotional and mental well being seriously had to pull back at least a bit from last week’s tragedy. We cant be constantly reminded of tragedy, bury our heads in the sand and pretend it’s not happening, no, but we do have to be sensitive to how much information we take in. But all of this reminded me of a time when I couldn’t diffuse because I was in the front seat of grief.
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 A much younger cousin of mine came up to me  only a few hours after my mother’s funeral and said, “Whew, I’m glad that’s over.” It that moment I thought to myself, yeah maybe for you. The funeral was only just a step for me in a very long process of grieving. We in the public, especially those who are African American can feel real grief, pain, threat, fear, all of that, as it relates to the killing of Black men and women by brutal police. This hits home because we understand full well that what happened to them  could happen to us, or someone we know or love. But our grief cant touch the surface of those who are directly tied to these men who lost their lives last week, or last year, or 10 years ago, or 100 years ago. (Because we do know the killing of Black folk by police or authorities is not a new phenomenon right? It being caught on film is the only new thing… but I digress.) Like me during those grief stricken days closely connected in time to my own mother’s death, the family and friends of Mr Alton Sterling and Mr Philando Castile cannot so easily disconnect from their pain with distractions on television and Facebook.
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Alton Sterling was a working married man. He was taking care of his children who adored him. In the picture to the upper right is his 15 year old baby boy, Cameron Sterling crying out during his father’s funeral. It was Cameron who most connected me to who Alton was during his outcry through last week’s press conference. It’s in moments of a human expression of agony that connects us to a sense of loss. I think they call that empathy. Cameron didn’t deserve to loose his daddy.
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Philando Castile was an all around good guy who was loved by family, friends and his community. The picture to the upper left is a powerful photo that speaks to the spirit of the African American experience during loss.  The hands raised represent the choosing to hold ones head high even when your loved one was taken senselessly. The white suits represent the purity of this young man’s spirit and the love he had for the children he served at the elementary school he worked for.
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Neither of these men deserved to die. None of these families deserved to bury their loved ones today. Praying for Alton’s family and friends. Praying for Philando’s family and friends. Praying for Cameron who misses his father at such an impressionable age of early manhood. Praying for Diamond Reynolds and her daughter who witnessed murder in cold blood.
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Praying for our nation to fully grow into the base understanding of the value of life in black skin.